Eat…Drink…Abuja!!!

Eat…Drink…Abuja!!!

The #EatDrinkFestival Abuja edition is the second event that That Green Tea experienced in a more official capacity thanks to the EDL team. The first coverage, #EatDrinkLagos can be found here

James Beard once said that food is our common ground, a universal experience (for everyone because we all eat) and this was brought to life at the Eat Drink Festival held in Abuja for the first time after being hosted in Lagos for the past five years. The event which saw the coming together of food vendors, mixologists, chefs, food enthusiasts, and bloggers had something for everyone who came to Harrow Park with an empty stomach and a full appetite.

#EatDrinkAbuja

Most vendors familiar with the Abuja festival spirit would say that “Abuja people come out late,” which they did. But few hours into the festival, crowds were gathering, holding conversations, and dancing to the music while the vendors were doing their very best, from setting up their stand to organizing their wares in the most eye-catching manner to make sure that everything went on smoothly in their stall. An interesting concept which most of them employed was the switching up of things with their menus.

Press pass gang ( gang gang )

While Waffle Stop stuck to something simple to give people an easier going and fun experience, Jaka’s Grill who has been playing out the dare of owning a food business for the past five month, used the opportunity to up his game by launching a full menu with new and exotic additions like extra delicious burgers which are so cute you could eat them whole.

We love a good flat lay. We love a food flat lay even better

For lovers of a sweet tooth, Buttercream Abuja brought their best sellers and most popular indulgence; my favorite was the banana bread which literary breaks down into several pieces of joy as you chew. Legal Tender Cocktails lived up to its name, a lawyer owned business, it gave us the sunny side up of things with drinks like a Beauty & The Beet, Mojito, Glow Up which were 100% non alcoholic and geared towards freshness, a healthy lifestyle, and tremendous benefits for your skin all at very affordable prices.

The interesting about the festival for me, apart from the cook-off, Chef Punshak’s demo, karaoke, and virtual reality pods was the cashless policy of the event.

Thanks to the introduction of wristbands, where all your monies are stored up, vendors and customers were saved the stress of exchanging of currencies, standing in queues and worst of all, looking for change! (We know how stressful that can be).

How far can your love of food take you? The answer is very far because it was surprising to see that some vendors such as Korede Spaghetti, Ette’s Barbeque came all the way from Lagos and boy, did they leave their mark. Korede, a photographer and dancer who when forced with the dilemma of having to choose between three passions, chose the stove, gave the attendees, spicy hot spaghetti and his special; Korede ponmo ( for you non-Nigerians, this is cow skin. Yes. Cow skin. Keep it pushing) sauce which came with a side of fresh fries.

Ette’s Barbeque would give the feel of home with roasted items such as plantain popularly known as Boli and yam in extra spicy sauce.

Everyone can say that they had fun in the event, mainly because there was something for everyone who showed up. If you wanted alcohol, there was the Crazy People’s Cocktails or Entrees Cocktails that came in pineapple or extreme colorful mixtures. If you wished for sugar and more sweetness, Ice Pops which sold out by the way and Yougurberry was your go-to stall.

Of course, there is no Nigerian event without the signature Jollof rice, which thanks to Corperate Jollof, wore a tie and pretty good shoes with its original taste and flavor. Pow, a PanAsian restaurant gave us a feel of what it meant to have intercontinental dishes such as Pow special fried rice which contained eggs and Szechuan chicken, which was spicy.

Not only did the festival allow people to network, but it also created the perfect ambiance for friends, loved ones, and families who needed a place to unwind and chill. Most attendees testified that they didn’t expect the festival to be so all out and they look forward to the next one, I know I do.


All images were captured with permission by Shade Olaoye for the blog and are therefore the property of That Green Tea.

All vendors mentioned are welcome to post this on their respective media channels.

For any enquires and collaborations, email us at contact@thatgreentea.com

 

  • Mental Health Check In

    September 14, 2020 by

    September 10th was World Prevention Suicide Day, and we are soon approaching World Mental Health Day on October 10th. However, I can not help but think about the anxiety/depression that creeps in on an individual when suicide becomes the only option they feel they have left. I have struggled with both anxiety and depression on… Read more

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How Youths of Minna Are Using Car Drifting Stunts As a Tool For Brotherhood

How Youths of Minna Are Using Car Drifting Stunts As a Tool For Brotherhood

The city is known for social events like a horse race, commonly known as Hawa; often organized to celebrate things like a sister’s wedding, a brother’s walimah, a friend’s graduation, etc. The most spectacular and grand Hawa however, occurs only during Sallah celebrations. The whole city meets to watch, and the King is usually part of the horse riders; not racing, but making a royal appearance. But another social event Minna is known for is Car drifting stunts.

Car drifting is the process of overly accelerating a car around a stage, causing it to release a cloud of exhaust fumes in its trail. This is done for fun and competitions and is becoming increasingly popular amongst youths of Minna, the capital city of Niger State.

Wikipedia defines car drifting as,

“A driving technique where the driver intentionally oversteers, with loss of traction in the rear wheels or all tires, while maintaining control and driving the car through the entirety of a corner. Car drifting occurs when the rear slip angle is greater than the front slip angle, to such an extent that often the front wheels are pointing in the opposite direction to the turn (e.g., the car is turning left, wheels are pointed right or vice versa, also known as a reverse lock or counter-steering)”

Car drifting stunts first started in Japan in 1970, by a man named Kunimitsu Takahashi. He was first a motorcyclist and then a driver. He would go on to win major awards for car drifting competitions.

The end aim of car drifting is usually to produce exhaust fumes from the burning of car tires.

Keiichi Tsuchiya, another Japanese, known as the “Drift King” came into history upon encountering Tahakashi’s drifting techniques. Sometime in the late 90s, particularly in 1996, Drifting began to gain more popularity outside of Japan, in places like California.

Drift League presents Tokyo Wedding Party

On 10th February 2019, Minna car drifters converged at 3-Arm Zone to have Drifting stunts in celebration of a sister of one of their top members who recently got married. They called it Tokyo-Wedding Party from the Drift-league. Before this, they had made a flyer and shared it across social media, inviting people to come to to to to watch.

The bride was in attendance with two of her friends to witness the fun celebration. Her hands and feet had henna, and her face was heavily made up. She wore a black hijab.

At 4:30 pm, the stage was still mostly empty and exuded a serene, peaceful atmosphere, even though the event had scheduled for 4:00 pm.

Soon, drifters and spectators started to arrive in trickles. Some of them had customized t-shirts. Most casually dressed in t-shirts and jeans.

When the first car arrived, it did so with a grand announcement; tires were screeching hard against the cemented inter-locked ground as people cheered.

In about an hour, the arena was full of drifters and watchers alike. And so the fun began. As spectacular as the view often was, it sometimes left fear in the mouth of watchers especially first-time viewers. But not for the young men standing around the arena and cheering loudly as each car began its show.

In about an hour, the arena was full of drifters and watchers alike. And so the fun began. As spectacular as the view often was, it sometimes left fear in the mouth of watchers especially first-time viewers. But not for the young men standing around the arena and cheering loudly as each car began its show.

A small car first drove into the arena and began to accelerate round and round in a way that made eyes dizzy. And then it drove off the cemented road into a corner filled with sand. Once there, the driver began to press hard on the accelerator, while at the same time steering the wheel in a direction opposite the direction the tires were headed. This sent the tires rolling hard against the sand in one direction and then breathing loads of sand in, and leaving clouds of dust erupting into the air. Once this was achieved, the car veered back onto the road and accelerated hard, leading the tires into burning smoke out in spirals and spirals of fumes that drove the crowd into cheers.

Several cars did this in turns, each trying to outdo the one before it, producing more and more smoke.

As night drew closer, the bride and her two friends, who had been mere viewers before now, were invited into one of the cars whose turn it was to drift. They went in. Once the car started, they began to scream in what could have been terror, or excitement, or both. But the driver did not stop. He drifted until the tires burned and there were thick clouds of smoke. By the time he finished, and the three women alighted from the car, they each clutched their chests in obvious terror and tried to gain their breaths back. The crowd cheered.

Towards the end of the show, word went round that there was to be a Hawa on the 24th of February, in honor of a member’s brother who had recently done his Qur’anic graduation.

There is a fabric that binds the youths of this city together, and it is called brotherhood.


This article is a collaboration between Writer, Hauwa Shaffii Nuhu, and Photographer Victor Adewale.

This project is part of a final assignment to conclude my time at That Green Tea. I am available for any future literary collaborations as needed. Follow me on social media on IG: @waasishafii and Twitter: @waasishafii

All images are the original work of Victor Adewale on IG: @victoradewale_ and Twitter: @victoradewale_

  1. Drifting (motorsport). (2019, January 22). Retrieved February 13, 2019, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drifting_(motorsport)

Eat.Drink.Lagos…. Repeat!

Eat.Drink.Lagos…. Repeat!

#EatDrinkFestival is a one of a kind festival and social event. Now in its fifth year, the team is taking #EatDrinkFestival to greater heights. In addition to bites and sips from a dynamic selection of Lagos’ upcoming vendors, pop-ups from celebrity and aspiring chefs, and hobbyist cooks, the Food Festival is an annual event set in the beautiful bay of the Lekki coliseum. The festival takes place every year in the last days of the year after the holidays (ikr, what a way to end the year).

The Food Festival combines innovation and interaction with the audiences. In just six years, the Festival has gained momentum with around 30,000 visitors in only one weekend. The primary purpose of the festival is to communicate inspiration and gastronomic knowledge about the cosmopolitan culture to all of its visitors.

What was offered was a wide range of special events and tastings with a focus on indigenous food culture – from seaweed safaris to sausage-making and cabbage workshops, to gourmet picnics along the boulevard. Visitors of all ages will discover engaging and insightful activities and master classes.

There was an atmosphere driven by enthusiasm and passion for local food culture and seeks to promote the Nigerian kitchen nationally as well as internationally. It gathered some of the leading producers, chefs, and enthusiasts to raise questions and create experiences around cosmopolitan/indigenous food for all its visitors.

Jollof Rice, the pride of West African cuisine with sweet corn and honey wings

Smolefikpots was my fave at the festival the corn did taste like it was drizzled with honey (or was it raspberry?). The chicken was a tad bit over seasoned but the flavor was toned down with the spring onion, and do not get me started on the Jollof rice, exactly how I like it; slightly burnt and moist. It was foodie heaven.

Thanks to the blog ( *coughs* Fatima) I did not miss out on dessert. I had chocolate banana drizzled doughnut with honey dips and sprinkles. When I tell you the entire thing melted in my mouth like whipped cream (Y’all gon think I’m lying, but I’m not). Here’s a rare photo of heaven in a box.

Guests could choose from relatively simple meals such as seafood Jollof and ofada Jollof to more exciting concoctions such as Jollof samosa, Jollof shawarma, groundnut jollof rice, Jollof arancini and acha (Fonio) Jollof.

Other options included Jollof risotto, Jollof couscous, nkwobi ( spicy cow foot) Jollof, Jollof burrito, coconut jollof rice, smokey ofada infused Jollof rice, Jollof gnocchi, and Jollof quinoa which could be washed down with cocktails, zobo, smoothies, beer and of course water. There was gelato and popsicles (some alcoholic) for when the weather got hot.

For the people who, for some reason, weren’t there for Jollof anything, there were other options including dirty rice, chicken wings, pork chops, small chops, asun ( spicy goat meat usually roasted), cookies, BBQ wings, native rice, and salads. The Food Festival did offer a diversity of opportunities and great experiences to a broad group of people in just one weekend.

Hopefully next year’s even more thrilling.


Rashineh is passionate about covering events in the Lagos metropolitan area and is available for collaborations.

Email: contact@thatgreentea.com

Don’t forget to like, share and follow us on all platforms!

IG: @rashinehfromaccounting

All images are original works of Rashineh and the property of That Green Tea blog.

The Duality of December

The Duality of December

December can be the most beautiful yet most begrudging time of the year for me. The sun is a rare sight, my skin is unbearably dry, and I am frantically trying to relearn an entire semester’s worth of information in a few days while simultaneously balancing work and a sprinkle of social life. In exchange, my mental well-being crumbles.

   My mental health is something that I strive to be open and honest about, and in December, my mental health dissipated. My routine of school, work, friends, more school, even more, work, and less time for me spun me into a spot where I was perpetually exhausted, uninterested in my interests, and refusing to face the realities of my poor mental care habits. After my exams were all said and done, I made an effort to pick up the pieces of my shattered creative habits.

For the first time in almost two months, I picked up a pen and had an open and honest discussion with myself regarding my seeming inability to do any creative work of any sort. My writing folder had multiple months-old separate files of two lackluster sentences of half-developed ideas. I hadn’t taken any photos I was proud of. I hadn’t even tried anything special with makeup. Nothing felt natural enough to pursue. My mantra when I start a new project is don’t push yourself to the point where you’re making stagnant, boring work to get it done. This concept draws a fine line between laziness versus blockage, and I began to realize that the bare trees, brown grass, and clouds along with some schoolwork I wasn’t passionate about were all contributing to this bout of stagnation.

With the stress of school removed and about three straight days of self-care (which included lots of face masks and many listens to Lorde’s Pure Heroine) the fog is beginning to clear, and my December has turned around and I set out on my first project in a long while, which for me was burning through gas to see those light displays that make your stomach flutter with cheer. You can’t exactly stop and smell the roses in winter, but you sure can stop and photograph some light displays.

Most wouldn’t consider Lincoln to be a city that could be defined as beautiful, but the effort put in by the residents indeed show out to spruce up and change the perspective on a town that seemingly never changes. It’s the little things that have sparked me to get back into a routine to create, and I couldn’t be more excited. Below are some of the places that made me feel that spark (too cheesy, wow), and while you can’t be there to experience them for yourself, I put my heart into trying to capture these. Enjoy.


Mckenna is a third-year student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the College of Journalism studying Advertising and Public Relations. She is currently interning for That Green Tea Blog.

All the images are original photos and the property of McKenna Arthur and should be used with permission. We will know if they aren’t. ( yes we will)

Follow Mckenna on Instagram (@mckennaarthur) or send an email to contact@thatgreentea.com for any collaborations.